Home    About Us   Contact Us    Reviews   Articles   Six Day Mini Course    Site Map 

 

 

Dog Jumping

How To Stop Your Dog From Jumping Up On You Or Your Guests

 

Jumping up on people is a real problem for dog owners. The problem is frequently created by you the dog owner when your dog was a puppy. Your puppy comes running up to you full of excitement and tries to jump up when she gets to you. You, naturally, bend down and pet your puppy or pick her up or start to play with her. In all three cases, you're rewarding your puppy for her actions which is coming to you and jumping up on you. Your puppy learns quickly that jumping is a good thing because it results in positive attention and physical contact. Unfortunately, your puppy doesn't know the difference between when she was a 5 pound puppy and now, when she can be as much as a 50 pound dog. Unless she's taught differently, she thinks that jumping up is a good thing to do.

 

After your puppy gets a little older and you find that her jumping is no longer fun to you or your guests, it's time to let her know, in no uncertain terms, that jumping up is no longer tolerated. If your dog is a small toy breed, you may take her jumping up as a sign of excitement and affection. However, your guests may not, especially those who are not dog lovers. In general, it's good form to teach your dog to not jump up on people.

 

There are a few different techniques that are used to teach dogs to not jump up on people. Here are three of them, although the third one is for larger dogs. Which ever technique you chose, be consistent. You have to do the same thing every time your dog jumps up on you. That means that you can never allow your dog to jump up on you without giving her a correction, and it must be the same correction every time. 

 

Technique No. 1

When your dog jumps up, immediately fold your arms and turn your back to her and ignore her. Don't say anything. If you say something to her, regardless of what it is, she's getting your attention. The idea is to completely ignore her. Dogs can read and understand body language much better than humans. You're using your posture to convey to your dog that jumping up is unacceptable. You do have to keep an eye on her, so you can praise her as soon as all four feet are on the ground, but avoid eye contact. It is important to give your dog lavish praise, or even a treat, as soon as she has calmed down and all four paws are on the ground. If she starts to jump up when you give her praise, immediately turn your back to her again, and wait until she has four paws on the ground. Then praise her again. Do this every time she jumps up and she will soon learn that she gets the cold shoulder when she jumps up and gets praise and a treat when she stands or sits with all four paws on the ground.

 

Technique No. 2

This technique requires a little more action and skill on your part. The action you take is a function of the size of your dog. For larger dogs, when your dog jumps up on you, raise your knee so that the dog jumps into your knee. Then, push the dog away from you with your knee and give her the command "Off". As soon as your dog has all four paws on the ground, give her lavish praise, or a treat – or both. If she tries to jump up again, give her your knee again, but praise as soon as al four paws are on the ground. As in technique no. 1, you must be consistent and do the same thing every time your dog jumps up.  For smaller dogs, instead of using your knee, use the toe of your shoe. You don't want to kick your dog. You just want your dog to jump into the toe of your shoe, and then use your toe to push her back and give her the command "Off".  Once all four paws are on the ground, give her lavish praise. If she tries to jump up again, make sure she jumps into you toe. Then, lavish praise when all four paws are on the ground. Your dog will learn that she gets rewarded when she keeps all four  paws on the ground and that "Off" means to not jump up.

 

Technique No. 3

This technique is for dogs that are large enough so that when they jump up on you, you can grab their front paws without bending down. And that's exactly what you do. When you dog jumps up, grab their front paws firmly with your hands, one hand for each paw, and hold onto the paw until your dog starts to struggle to free herself from your gasp. Most dogs don't like their paws held firmly. As soon as your dog starts to struggle, give her the command "Off" and push her away from you. As soon as her four paws are on the ground, give her lots of praise. As with the other techniques, you must be consistent and do the same thing every time your dog jumps up. Your dog will soon realize that she gets her paws held firmly every time she jumps up on you and that it's not a fun thing to do. On the other hand, if she keeps all four paws on the ground, she gets rewarded.

 

I will repeat one more time, because it is so important, that you must take the same action every time your dog jumps up, or tries to jump up. The action must be immediate, and the reward must be given as soon as your dog's paws are all on the ground.

 

For more information on dog training, go to: Train Your Dog

 

A trained dog is a happy dog and has a happy owner

 

 

  Get Your Free Report

 abc

  About Dogs And Dog Training

     (a $47 value)

  

  As Featured On EzineArticles